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Asbestos Remediation

Among the many in-house services we are proud to provide, Insurcomm has two asbestos certified supervisors who have the depth of experience required to assess and remove this microscopic and dangerous substance. In fact, all of our on-site managers are educated to recognize this dangerous substance and report any findings to our specialists, as prolonged inhalation of these fibers can cause serious and fatal illnesses. Once it has been determined that the presence of this dangerous substance is present on site, our supervisors quarantine the area, file the appropriate paperwork with the state and the EPA, and secure the necessary permits for remediation. To avoid any conflict of interest, a third party is hired to conduct all testing and to write the abatement plan, a plan we then follow to standard. At Insurcomm, we understand that the removal of this dangerous substance involves the strict adherence to an intricate procedure followed by a delicate and thorough approach toward removal, and we deliver outstanding results. This is yet another reason why people hire us: we are a complete and thoroughly capable and skilled restoration company, possessing a variety of key in-house services that allow our customers the peace of mind they deserve during trying times.

The EPA website states that Asbestos is:

“A mineral fiber that occurs in rock and soil.Because of its fiber strength and heat resistance asbestos has been used in a variety of building construction materials for insulation and as a fire-retardant. Asbestos has also been used in a wide range of manufactured goods, mostly in building materials (roofing shingles, ceiling and floor tiles, paper products, and cement products), friction products (automobile clutch, brake, and transmission parts), heat-resistant fabrics, packaging, gaskets, and coatings.”

The EPA goes on to say that Asbestos may be found in the following locations:

  • Attic and wall insulation produced containing vermiculite
  • Vinyl floor tiles and the backing on vinyl sheet flooring and adhesives
  • Roofing and siding shingles
  • Textured paint and patching compounds used on wall and ceilings
  • Walls and floors around wood-burning stoves protected with asbestos paper, millboard, or cement sheets
  • Hot water and steam pipes coated with asbestos material or covered with an asbestos blanket or tape
  • Oil and coal furnaces and door gaskets with asbestos insulation
  • Heat-resistant fabrics
  • Automobile clutches and brakes
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